Behavioral Abnormalities Caused by Your Self-Defensive Mechanism

The translation of the meaning of dreams according to the scientific method of dream interpretation will help you understand the influence of the wild side of your conscience (anti-conscience) into the human side of your conscience. You will learn what determines your behavior and how to acquire sound mental health.

For example, dreams about other people give you information about your own behavior. Each person who appears in your dream is a part of your personality that has the same characteristics of the people who appear in the dream. Therefore, if you’ll have a dream about a person who has the tendency to distort the truth and present the facts according to their personal opinion, this means that a certain part of your personality imitates this person’s attitude.

Now, if the part of your personality who distorts the truth is a policeman in a dream, this means that this part of your personality is responsible for your self-defensive mechanism.

Putting everything together: Your self-defense is controlled by a component of your personality that has the tendency to lie and distort the truth.

When you’ll relate this information to your life biography (since you are the dreamer) you will understand that you have this self-defensive reaction because you had a traumatic childhood. You always defend yourself with a component of your personality that presents the truth according to your desires and not as it really is.

This attitude reflects abnormal behavior. Your abnormal behavior denounces the existence of a behavioral disorder. In other words, your anti-conscience managed to generate a mental illness within your human conscience because you had a trauma when you were a child.

You always have a self-defensive reaction given by a component of your personality that is not conscious, but belongs to your wild conscience. You adopt this behavior in order to protect yourself from the attacks of the world, and from your own thoughts. However, this reaction is based on absurd criteria.

Your self-defensive reaction is based on the distortion of the truth. It is the result of a traumatic experience. It is not a conscious and positive reaction before what is bad.

The unconscious mind analyzes your behavior in order to show you why you are making mistakes, and how you can stop doing what has a negative effect on your personality and life.

A mental illness is caused by the invasion of the absurdity of your anti-conscience into the human side of your conscience. It begins with a trauma and the acceptance of the absurd ideas of your wild side, which pretends to give you solutions to your problems.

All behavioral disorders reflect the control of your anti-conscience, which takes the place of your ego. It invades your conscience with its absurd ideas. Then, it gradually destroys your capacity to think logically. It also distorts your behavior. The unconscious mind gives you many explanations and lessons in the dream images in order to eliminate the negative influence of your anti-conscience.

Without understanding what causes absurd reactions and what kind of mistakes you make for being influenced by the absurdity of your anti-conscience, you cannot stop being a victim of your wild nature. Only after understanding what is negative and must be eliminated, will you acquire permanent mental stability and perfect behavioral health.

How State Budget Cuts Impact Continuity of Mental Health Care

Continuity of care between the inpatient and outpatient settings continues to be a challenge. Current hospital payments assume that hospitals are actively involved through discharge and the transition to outpatient settings and advocating for payments for outpatient providers to assist in this process is viewed as duplicative. This undermines mental health care providers’ ability to smoothly transition clients between service settings.

Meeting the credentialing requirements for program services and mental health professionals has posed new challenges. Community behavioral health organizations employ professionals that may not meet private insurers’ credentialing standards (for example, 3 years of post-licensure experience). Community providers have addressed this through contractual arrangements in which quality assurance and supervision requirements substitute for these credentialing standards. Services are billed under a supervisory protocol in which the supervising professional’s national provider identifier is used.

Additionally, some programs offer services that rely on a combination of funding sources such as county, state, and private insurers. In these situations, counties sometimes want to limit private insurance clients’ access to these programs because a portion of the overall program is covered by the county.

Impact of State Budget Cuts on Mental Health Care –

In a dramatic turnabout that may foreshadow dilemmas faced by other states, the governor of Minnesota vetoed funding for the state’s mental healthcare program. The legislature would have extended the program for several months, as a compromise was negotiated to retain elements of coverage for the state’s mental health population – a hospital uncompensated care fund, medication/pharmacy, and “coordinated care delivery systems.” In the system, an accountable hospital-centered program paid a fixed amount to cover about 40% of the state’s mental illness population who elected to participate. As there is no reimbursement for outpatient clinic and all non-hospital services, providers and consumers now are scrambling to seek disability determination or enroll in Medicare type coverage after the six month state mental illness coverage enrollment period ends.

While these cuts are only effective as of June 1, 2010, it is expected that they will result in increases to the uncompensated care burden on hospitals and community safety net providers.

How Do We Minimize The Impact of Budget Cuts on Mental Health Care?

Many not-for-profit membership organizations representing community mental health and other service provider agencies throughout Minnesota have been working in coalition with national mental health groups on advocacy related to the state’s mental health program changes. Initially, advocacy efforts were focused on encouraging the state legislature to vote in support of expanding the state Medicaid program early to receive additional federal funding (as provided for in the national healthcare reform bill). Unfortunately, this proved to be politically untenable in the immediate future; however, a measure was passed to allow the governor to use executive authority to expand Medicaid coverage for mental illness patients.

While being actively involved in this advocacy process is vitally important to the community behavioral health system, national mental health advocacy medicaid organizations and their members are also evaluating ways in which they can optimize their business practices to meet this changing budgetary reality. Among other strategies, community behavioral health providers are working to develop partnerships with community hospitals to reduce the number of avoidable emergency department admissions and ease the transition from the inpatient to outpatient settings, supporting clients through the disability determinations process so they may become eligible for Medicaid as quickly as possible, and raising funds that will help to cover the cost sharing requirements for state sponsored mental health care and the enrolled clients that are unable to pay.

Through this two-pronged approach that includes both advocacy and pragmatic business considerations, it is hoped that the community behavioral health system will be able to develop new cost-effective ways of delivering services that will be well-positioned to withstand funding changes while taking advantage of new opportunities made available through national and state health care reform initiatives.

Coaching & Consulting – Implications for the Mental Health Profession

This is the final article of a five part series exploring unique and noteworthy trends in the mental health profession. The article discusses the rise of professional coaching/consulting and its overall impact in the world of behavioral health. The purpose for examining all of these trends is to note business opportunities and competitive influences within the marketplace.

The Rise of Professional Coaches & Consultants

In early 2007 I was speaking with a friend of mine who told me he attended a relationship workshop he found to be very informative and helpful for both he and his wife. Naturally, I assumed it was a psychologist, marriage and family therapist, professional counselor or clinical social worker facilitating the program. Since I was in the field and felt I had a good handle on the marketplace I assumed I would know the clinician. When I asked the person’s name I did not recognize it. I asked my friend if the person was a therapist and he nodded his head in acknowledgement. Since I did not know this person I looked her up and realized she was not a clinician but a relationship coach.

There are several points worth noting about this conversation with my friend. One is the fact that there are people in your community providing a variety of individual and group services who are not mental health professionals in the traditional sense. The second point is that many of the people offering these services are very good at what they do, the third is that they are business savvy, know how to market their services and how to speak to consumers, and finally there is the reality that most people outside of mental health are not aware of the distinction between a mental health clinician and a relationship coach. They see them as interchangeable, as one in the same. Let’s briefly take a look at these important points since they speak to a phenomenon that will have more and more of an effect on the mental health profession as a whole.

a. Coaches & Consultants

Coaching is growing at an international level and these professionals are involved in numerous areas that overlap with mental health services. Some of these areas include career counseling, relationship counseling, leadership counseling, life change consulting, business consulting and grief counseling. They have done an excellent job penetrating highly lucrative markets such as Fortune 500 companies, CEO level executives, Schools and high end communities. In the past there was a stigma associated with this profession, however, the stigma has lessened considerably and in many parts of the world it is virtually non-existent. In addition, many of these programs and service offerings are of very high quality. They are well researched, innovative and highly structured. I recently attended a workshop delivered by a life coach who worked with people going through significant life changes whether it be death of a loved one, life threatening illness, divorce, career change, unemployment or any number of other things. The program was well defined, unique and utilized both clinical and coaching principles. It was a very effective program!

b. Marketing & Sales Savvy

Adding to the dilemma for mental health practitioners is the fact that many coaches are experienced in all areas of business. They know how to uncover needs/opportunities and then design and market programs that will speak to potential consumers. In many ways they are ahead of the curve in terms of sales and marketing principles. They are also able to leverage technology to improve their reach and to expand their presence in the market. Another interesting aspect to life coaching is that they are very specific with regards to who their target audience is, and as a result, they craft their message accordingly. These are important lessons to be aware of as you move forward in your career. Being clear as to who you are offering services to will help you to use your time wisely when it comes to marketing and selling. The good news is that you can learn a lot researching some of these professionals and taking a look at what they do effectively and not so effectively. Some areas I recommend researching are how coaches uncover what the customer wants and how they sell and market those services. All of this should generate new and fresh ideas for you!

Want some good examples of what I am talking about when I refer to Life Coaches?

Take a look at Marie Forleo and her website: www.thegoodlife-inc.com. She is a well-known coach who has received much praise for her work. Take a moment to view the site and hear what she has to say on her audio clip. Once you read the upcoming chapters of this book you will notice that she has adopted many of the principles I propose you begin using as soon as possible! Also take note of what she proposes to offer people and how she goes about doing this. You may not agree with her proposal to “skyrocket your productivity” and/or “revitalize your relationships”, however, what you cannot argue is the fact that she has successfully hit upon the needs and wants of her specific target audience.

Another site that will give you an idea of the power and scope life coaches and consultants offer is www.simpleology.com. This is a concept offered by marketing expert, Mark Joyner. He would not necessarily consider himself a life coach, however, his Simpleology program is based on scientific and behavioral research and is designed to help people manage and make sense of their hectic lives. It proposes to offer solutions that will increase your productivity and peace of mind. In addition, he leverages the power of the Internet to reach a broad audience by offering a sophisticated learning platform complete with free modules and software tools designed to help you prioritize and manage daily tasks and goals. His program should give mental health professionals a much better picture as to the kinds of programs and service offerings behavioral healthcare practitioners can develop and promote.

This article marks the end of my series on trends in the industry. Thank you for your interest! I hope this exercise gives you food for thought along with some new ideas for you to explore.

Copyright 2008 – David Diana.

Women in the Military May Experience Behavioral Health Issues After Combat Exposure

Wars and battles take a toll on the entire nation – ravaged locales, diminished human capital, and complete mayhem all around. However, when a country gets embroiled in wars or combats, there is one group that is affected directly – that of soldiers.

Exposure to combat or deployment in war zones can severely impact the soldiers’ mental health. Even after the war is long over, the soldiers continue to feel the pangs of the rigor. Not just men, even women in the military are as much prone to experience the agony, says a recent study. Depression, anxiety, and melancholy are what they are left with.

The research revealed that combat exposure in military women is associated with an increased likelihood of mental health problems after deployment. These women are more likely to experience behavioral health problems, like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and risk drinking.

Combat-exposed women in military have 20 times higher chance of PTSD

The 2016 study funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) analyzed combat exposure scores of 42,397 army enlisted women who returned from Afghanistan and Iraq. Based on their self-reported experiences, these women were assigned combat exposure scores of 0, 1, 2, or 3+.

The researchers found that the active duty and National Guard/Reserve women with a combat exposure score of 3+ had 20 times higher chance of developing PTSD compared to women who did not have any exposure to combat zones.

Even a single exposure or deployment to war zones for a brief period can raise the chance of developing behavioral health problems (PTSD, depression, and at-risk drinking) in these women, the study said. “Our findings suggest that injuries, assaults, and combat exposures experienced by women during deployment may have an additive, negative effect on their post-deployment behavioral health,” said Dr. Rachel Sayko Adams, lead author of the Journal of Traumatic Stress study.

Dealing with symptoms

Adequate measures should be taken so that these foreseeable behavioral health issues can be handled and better care can be provided to these combat-exposed women in military. Not only women, even men should be covered under such programs.

“Ongoing force-wide screening for behavioral health problems should be coupled with development and evaluation of programs to improve the psychological wellbeing of the Armed Forces,” said Dr. Rachel.

Dealing with PTSD

Behavioral health issues like PTSD can be mostly dealt with psychotherapy, but medications can also be used depending on the need. In most cases, love and support from people around can make a huge difference. The sadness and melancholy after a traumatic experience can be dissipated only when shared and cared.

The war exposed men and women in military are the classic cases of PTSD. They struggle hard to gel into the social fiber after their return from combat zones. They are always on the verge of exploding at the slightest provocation. They are fragile from inside, appear numb and disconnected.

But love and compassion from close ones can act as a soothing balm to their petrified minds. Helping them find a counselor is the first step towards reinstating their disoriented mind, so that they can mingle happily with the rest and enjoy a sense of belonging.

Recovery roadmap

Getting immediate help is the foremost step in handling mental health problems like PTSD or anxiety. Delayed treatment can worsen symptoms and complicate treatment intervention.

Health Literacy Is for the Healthy

“Health Literacy” is the ability to read, understand and act upon health information. And, more than half of the American population is not proficient on this topic. Unfortunately, the above definition is the point after which most head into the wrong direction. Unless a significant misnomer, by definition, the focus of health literacy should be two-fold, enhancement of functional literacy (period) and increased attention to the issues of health.

The general public reads very little non-commercial, health-related materials, the content being very challenging. Additionally, people consume too much sugar, consume alcohol and excesses of red meats, processed grains, artificial chemical additives, too few and unvaried fruits and vegetables, and eat too much. Many also smoke, use recreational drugs, misuse prescription drugs, exercise too little and engage in other social and recreational activities that are harmful to them physically and psychologically. Much of that which I just described and many more contributors to poor personal and public health are legally accessible and even marketed to you. The question is, who is responsible for your health knowledge and healthy behaviors (health care) versus your medical status (medical care)?

Your mechanic recommends selecting quality fuels, lubricants, and other fluids, and changing them regularly. You should manage your tires’ pressure and watch tread wear. You check your brakes’ function and monitor all for all other signs of possible malfunction. And, although there are plenty of after-market and alternative products and services by which to care for your vehicles, no clear-thinking person deviates demonstrably from use/maintenance recommendations if expecting vehicles to perform well and last. Such is because motor vehicles are sold with maintenance recommendations and schedules that you read, developing your “automotive care literacy”.

The western medical professional community markedly fails to train its cadre well in subjects of prevention, health maintenance, and safe. high performance, physical fitness for the masses. This also includes failure to train them to care substantially about the health literacy of their clientele. Nationally, we spend a lot of money on a Center for Disease Control, Planned Parenthood [primarily STD/STI and services for sex-related diseases], and local public health agencies (focus upon epidemiology, primary medical care, local epidemics management). And, we wrangle politically over the role of government versus the private sector for the provision of all services, particularly those that are values-based. However, public health literacy (education) is a non-revenue generating activity and receives minimal attention.

While in the public many clamor for inalienable rights to comprehensive medical care, the general public doesn’t march for the rights to universal health literacy. Nor does it ask the government to require the market to be more responsible for promoting products, services and social behaviors consistent with universal health. Yet, we must not allow the government, nor the socially and financially empowered to suggest that speaking against “unhealthy” environments, foods, untoward products and behaviors (and effects of) is inappropriate, and thereby “politically incorrect” behavior, unless you want current vocal ideologies to drive health care and not literacy.